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Canopy Climbing – Pre-booking Required

Pre-booking and an extra fee is required for this activity at Posada Amazonas. Booking can be done by contacting your Rainforest Specialist prior  your arrival.

The rainforests of Tambopata are renowned for their biodiversity. Innumerable species of plants, insects, and animals compete, prey upon, and avoid being eaten in every level of the forest. Although many species live in the understory and even at the edge of the forest, the highest percentage of life occurs in the roof of the rainforest, or canopy. Ironically, despite this being the part of the rainforest with the most species, it’s also the least explored part of the jungle.

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To study this very important level of the rainforest, scientists have developed safe and rather easy ways to access this special microhabitat. While canopy towers do provide access to viewing the upper levels of the forest, views are still limited to the parts of the forest in sight of the tower, and the branches adjacent to it. For better access, field biologists actually climb right up into the canopy. However, they don’t do so by climbing up the trunks and branches of a tree, but by using a special harness and climbing system that brings researchers to macaw nests in the upper reaches of the rainforest.

We offer the same method of canopy climbing as an activity for our guests because it provides a unique perspective of the top of the forest with a moderate amount of effort. After your trained guide outfits you with a harness and shows how to hoist yourself up the rope, you will be led to the climbing area, connected to the climbing rope, and will begin your journey up into the canopy, high above the forest floor. As you move through your vertical ascent, you may notice the different levels of the rainforest, and might even spot wildlife hidden in the branches. Enjoy the adventure of canopy climbing at our lodges to gain a 360 degree perspective of the rainforest.

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